ESL – The verb ‘to have’ Part 2

23 October

The verb ‘to have’ Part 2

 

Future Perfect

Use the future perfect to speak about actions that are completed up to a specific point in time in the future.

  • They will have finished the report for by two o’clock.
  • She will have found a job by the end of next week.

Future Perfect Continuous

Use the future perfect continuous to state the length of an action up to another future action.

  • Max will have been playing the piano for two hours by the time he finishes.
  • The students will have been studying for five hours by the time they take the test.

Have To Do for Obligation

Use have to do something to speak about our daily obligations. This form can have the same meaning as must, but is generally preferred when speaking about responsibilities. The negative form don’t / didn’t have to do something refers to an action which is not required of someone, but possible.

  • Doug has to get up early every day.
  • They had to leave early to catch the flight.
  • He will have to get up early tomorrow.

Have Got for Obligation

Have got to do is used informally in the United States with the same meaning as have to do. This form is fine for informal conversations, but should not be used in formal writing.

  • I’ve got to finish this report soon.
  • She’s got to keep calm and focus.
  • They’ve got to keep up with the Jones’.

Have Someone Do

Have someone do something is used as a causative verb. A causative verb expresses something that someone causes to happen but does not do.

  • We have people visit us all the time.
  • Sherry had her children playing in the garden.
  • I’d have music being performed at my funeral.

Have Something Done

Have something done is used as a causative verb to speak about something that you arrange to have done for you as a service.

  • She had them delivered to her home.
  • We had Jack promoted to director.
  • She had her lawn mowed this past weekend.

Thank you for visiting my blog

Gordon

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